Active Projects

Landslide Best Practices.

Project Objectives:

A best practices compilation document for Landslides will be prepared. It will:

  1. Identify class/types of landslides impacting southwestern PA infrastructures (this has already been accomplished for the most part);
  2. Identify corrective actions taken for each landslide class/type; and
  3. Identify challenges in design procedures and permitting processes, which will include recommended revisions to design specifications.

MtThe project will produce a region-specific guidance document applicable to Southwestern Pennsylvania including Greene, Washington, Fayette, Indiana, Allegheny and Westmoreland counties, along with the river valleys particularly along the Monongahela River basin. The target audience is practicing geotechnical engineers and geologists who are engaged in mitigating adverse impacts from an active landslide or reducing risk of landslide movement for infrastructure.

Download link: Project Scope

 

Preliminary Evaluation of Pavement Surface Distresses Related to Pavement Markings.

Project Objectives:

Marking-Pavement-DistressRoad marking research has been traditionally focused on the life-cycle performance of various marking materials in terms of durability and visibility.  However, transportation agencies have reported the presence of pavement distresses such as cracking and raveling under or along pavement markings. It causes concerns that trapping of excess moisture under the marking and the difference in temperature from the marking to the pavement surface initiates and/or facilitates pavement distresses in the vicinity of marking. This project will investigate whether pavement markings are causing pavement surface deterioration and, if so, will develop approaches for mitigation of the problem. 

Download link: Project Scope

 

Remote-Controlled Technology Assessment for Safer Pavement Construction and QA/QC.

Project Objectives:

Remote-Control-Pavement-DevicePavement quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) and other field testing and evaluation processes often require active workers’ presence at the construction site thus increasing the potential for accidents due to traffic interaction. As work safety is one of the most important aspects of pavement construction and evaluation, there is a high demand for remote-controlled techniques and processes that would keep pavement workers away from direct harm while also assuring highly effective QA/QC and testing operations.  This project will identify and review new and emerging remote-controlled processes with focus on pavement QA/QC, testing and evaluation recently developed in the U.S. and abroad that are potentially implementable.  The project will provide information on the latest developments and facilitate implementation of the emerging pavement technologies in order to develop safer and more effective pavement construction and evaluation methodologies. 

Download link: Project Scope

 

Developing Methodologies to Predict and Quantify the Benefits of IRISE Research.

Project Objectives:

Methodologies will be developed and applied to research results developed by IRISE for several highway infrastructure projects to predict and quantify benefits.  Tasks will be performed to evaluate current methodologies used to predict changes in highway infrastructure relative to longevity and resulting cost reductions. These existing methodologies and novel methods will be developed and applied based upon successful and meaningful results from the IRISE projects being funded. The methodologies will be applied by quantifying and extrapolating data available from the IRISE partners and other publicly available information on a national or state scale for highway infrastructure and user costs. 

Download link: Project Scope

 

Improving Bridge Assessment through the Integration of Conventional Visual Inspection, Non-Destructive Evaluation, and Structural Health Monitoring Data.

Project Objectives:

Recently, there have been numerous investigations on merging the fast-growing cyber-physical structural health monitoring (SHM) technologies as well as non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques into infrastructure monitoring. Despite the obvious advantages of all these techniques, there is a huge gap in the establishment of effective approaches to fuse the data acquired from all of these paradigms to make informed decisions related to assessment, management, preservation, and renewal.

The primary purpose of this study is to establish a framework capable of leveraging emerging Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques to provide improved performance assessment of bridges. In particular, the proposed framework would focus on addressing the principal challenges associated with studying the service life of bridge structures, which are related to (a) the long-time scales (which requires accelerated aging), and (b) the diverse outputs related to bridge condition (in terms of data collected through SHM, NDE, and visual inspection). The primary focus would be on identifying the synergies among bridge degradation, remaining service life, and the results taken from the multimodal sensing technologies (such as SHM and NDE). 

Download Link: Project Scope

Early Opening of Concrete Pavements to Traffic.

Project Objectives:

Current empirical methods for determining traffic-opening criteria can be overly conservative causing unnecessary construction delays and user costs.  These criteria require wait periods after concrete placement or achievement of certain levels of compressive and/or flexural strength of concrete.

The proposed research will develop innovative mechanistic-based procedures for quantifying the risk of premature failure and long-term damage caused by traffic opening at various concrete strength levels.  A methodology for the accurate monitoring of in-situ concrete early age development will be proposed.  The objective of the research is to develop a strategy that can be implemented by IRISE members for the optimal timing of the opening of new concrete pavements to traffic.

The scope of the project includes literature review, lab and field testing, development of a mechanistic-empirical model for prediction of concrete pavement damage due to early opening, and recommendations for early opening data analysis.  It will utilize recent developments in nondestructive testing of concrete.  

Download Link: Project Scope